Taking a Path Untraveled

Most of the managers we work with are also managed futures investors- that’s not all that uncommon. But how often do you hear of an investor becoming a CTA?

Such is the story of one Andrew Abraham, the manager of Abraham Investment Management (no- not the one you’re thinking of – that’s Abraham Trading Company). We were intrigued by the path that led him here, and asked him if he’d be willing to share his story. Turns out- it’s sort of a good one.

The following is a personal account of an individual experience in managed futures. Everyone will have a unique experience, so this story may not represent what your own experience will be. While reading, please remember that futures trading presents a substantial risk of losses, and that past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results.

I sold discount clothing to put myself through college. The business was outlet stores before the times of Ross and Marshalls, and I did well with it. I sold the business in 1994. Suddenly, I had a large amount of capital at my disposal. I didn’t know what to do with that much money, so I addressed my accountant and lawyer. Two stories stuck out for me.

The first person was described as “the most successful investor I’ve ever seen” by my accountant (a local dentist- imagine that). He had no idea how he did it, but he always seemed to be brining in steady returns, regardless of how stocks were doing.

The second person was actually an IB (Introducing Broker) who was in my fraternity in college, and he suggested an alternative to stocks and bonds. Ironically, he’s still the broker I work with today.

The strategy used by the dentist and ultimately advised by my broker was one called “trend following.” It wasn’t fancy or exceedingly complex- quite the contrary. The principles involved (even if not the actual mathematics) were very simple. Identify the trend. Capitalize on the breakout. Cut losses quickly.

Just because the ideas were simple didn’t mean it was easy. I bumbled and stumbled with own trading, and was very lucky to have mentors along the way (a perk of working in this industry). I shied away from fundamental trading and complicated approaches, embracing the KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) perspective. Though I made mistakes, each one was a learning experience that enabled me to add filters that would (theoretically) mitigate the severity of the drawdown.

And there was certainly a lot to learn. Ideas like risk per trade were foreign to me. Sector diversification wasn’t even a consideration. Margin to equity- why did that matter? These were all things I learned the hard way. Sometimes you wake up and you get your head handed to you. It’s not pretty, but you can either learn from it or burn out.

I’m proud of the programs I’ve developed. The strategies are basic robust trend following concepts with various levels of risk filters. I focus on maintaining very conservative margin to equity ratios, risking small dollar amounts per trade (instead of just focusing on percent risk per trade), and I still use many of the basic trend following concepts I was exposed to so long ago.

Like many in the space, though, I am still an investor, and I’m not sure I’ll ever not invest in managed futures. I buy into drawdowns and I look for hungry managers- I want to be reminded of my own passion.

Look, don’t get me wrong- there is no magic system, and drawdowns are going to happen. They are going to be painful and scary and worse than you thought. That’s the risk involved in futures trading.  Most investors want to ask something like, how was your August? I had a nice August, but it doesn’t mean anything. I could have a bad September. That’s not the way to look at it. Trend following is a long-term perspective, and is liquid, transparent, and provides the possibility of compounding money over time. I’m a believer.

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Disclaimer
The performance data displayed herein is compiled from various sources, including BarclayHedge, and reports directly from the advisors. These performance figures should not be relied on independent of the individual advisor's disclosure document, which has important information regarding the method of calculation used, whether or not the performance includes proprietary results, and other important footnotes on the advisor's track record.

Benchmark index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship, self reporting, and instant history.

Managed futures accounts can subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees. The numbers within this website include all such fees, but it may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits in the future to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets.

Investors interested in investing with a managed futures program (excepting those programs which are offered exclusively to qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7) will be required to receive and sign off on a disclosure document in compliance with certain CFT rules The disclosure documents contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA, as well as the composite performance of accounts under the CTA's management over at least the most recent five years. Investor interested in investing in any of the programs on this website are urged to carefully read these disclosure documents, including, but not limited to the performance information, before investing in any such programs.

Those investors who are qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7 and interested in investing in a program exempt from having to provide a disclosure document and considered by the regulations to be sophisticated enough to understand the risks and be able to interpret the accuracy and completeness of any performance information on their own.

RCM receives a portion of the commodity brokerage commissions you pay in connection with your futures trading and/or a portion of the interest income (if any) earned on an account's assets. The listed manager may also pay RCM a portion of the fees they receive from accounts introduced to them by RCM.

See the full terms of use and risk disclaimer here.

Disclaimer
The performance data displayed herein is compiled from various sources, including BarclayHedge, and reports directly from the advisors. These performance figures should not be relied on independent of the individual advisor's disclosure document, which has important information regarding the method of calculation used, whether or not the performance includes proprietary results, and other important footnotes on the advisor's track record.

Benchmark index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship, self reporting, and instant history.

Managed futures accounts can subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees. The numbers within this website include all such fees, but it may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits in the future to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets.

Investors interested in investing with a managed futures program (excepting those programs which are offered exclusively to qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7) will be required to receive and sign off on a disclosure document in compliance with certain CFT rules The disclosure documents contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA, as well as the composite performance of accounts under the CTA's management over at least the most recent five years. Investor interested in investing in any of the programs on this website are urged to carefully read these disclosure documents, including, but not limited to the performance information, before investing in any such programs.

Those investors who are qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7 and interested in investing in a program exempt from having to provide a disclosure document and considered by the regulations to be sophisticated enough to understand the risks and be able to interpret the accuracy and completeness of any performance information on their own.

RCM receives a portion of the commodity brokerage commissions you pay in connection with your futures trading and/or a portion of the interest income (if any) earned on an account's assets. The listed manager may also pay RCM a portion of the fees they receive from accounts introduced to them by RCM.

See the full terms of use and risk disclaimer here.