The Scary Commodities this Halloween

Halloween is here once more, and everyone around the office is gearing up: carving pumpkins, buying candy for trick or treat-ers, and last minute runs to the store for costumes. To get everyone else in the mood, we found some Halloween like similarities in the futures markets we couldn’t help but share.

Costumes:

Last year, it was the US Dollar/Euro Currency Battle Signal that got us excited for Halloween (Who doesn’t love bat man?)… and now that Bat Signal has transformed into one of the most feared villains in the galaxy… Jabba the Hutt, of course.

USD EUR(Disclaimer: Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results)

Jabba

A couple weeks ago we went in depth about the US Dollar having its best quarter in years , and how Managed Futures has historically benefited from it (past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results), but what else is out there on Halloween Eve?

Scary Vs:

We’re talking a shock to the system…. That Damned V Reversal. Here’s Why you should be Afraid of the V-Shaped Reversal

That Damned V(Disclaimer: Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results)

V for Vendetta

Chocolate:

Everyone needs their fill of snickers, Milky Way, 3 musketeers on Halloween. But where that chocolate comes from has but the market in limbo the past couple of weeks. It appears, the Cocoa market decided to get nice and scary (volatile) just in time for the ghosts and goblins to come out. That’s just your basic up move of around 12% and -13.5% fall in about a month and a half… nothing to see here, move along.

Cocoa
(Disclaimer: Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results)

Sugar: Super Scary

For those that don’t like Chocolate (see here), there’s the laffy taffies, the warheads, the sour patch kids… basically… Sugar…. And lots of it. The market jumped out it’s mountain trend to start the year and has been choppy ever since.

Sugar(Disclaimer: Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results)

We don’t expect sugar prices to go up anytime soon just because of Halloween, but recent studies show that the brain has the same reaction of cocaine as to sugar, suggesting that there might never be low demand.

Sugar Cocaine

 

That’s enough to maybe sway one of two people to be long sugar for the couple of the next couple years (or maybe short depending if the government calls for harsher restrictions).

We’ll leave that explanation to the journalists who make you really step back and think about it.  Here’s John Oliver from  Last Week Tonight doing his best to explain Sugar.  Have a happy Halloween, and don’t have too much sugar.

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Disclaimer
The performance data displayed herein is compiled from various sources, including BarclayHedge, and reports directly from the advisors. These performance figures should not be relied on independent of the individual advisor's disclosure document, which has important information regarding the method of calculation used, whether or not the performance includes proprietary results, and other important footnotes on the advisor's track record.

Benchmark index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship, self reporting, and instant history.

Managed futures accounts can subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees. The numbers within this website include all such fees, but it may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits in the future to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets.

Investors interested in investing with a managed futures program (excepting those programs which are offered exclusively to qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7) will be required to receive and sign off on a disclosure document in compliance with certain CFT rules The disclosure documents contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA, as well as the composite performance of accounts under the CTA's management over at least the most recent five years. Investor interested in investing in any of the programs on this website are urged to carefully read these disclosure documents, including, but not limited to the performance information, before investing in any such programs.

Those investors who are qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7 and interested in investing in a program exempt from having to provide a disclosure document and considered by the regulations to be sophisticated enough to understand the risks and be able to interpret the accuracy and completeness of any performance information on their own.

RCM receives a portion of the commodity brokerage commissions you pay in connection with your futures trading and/or a portion of the interest income (if any) earned on an account's assets. The listed manager may also pay RCM a portion of the fees they receive from accounts introduced to them by RCM.

See the full terms of use and risk disclaimer here.

Disclaimer
The performance data displayed herein is compiled from various sources, including BarclayHedge, and reports directly from the advisors. These performance figures should not be relied on independent of the individual advisor's disclosure document, which has important information regarding the method of calculation used, whether or not the performance includes proprietary results, and other important footnotes on the advisor's track record.

Benchmark index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship, self reporting, and instant history.

Managed futures accounts can subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees. The numbers within this website include all such fees, but it may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits in the future to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets.

Investors interested in investing with a managed futures program (excepting those programs which are offered exclusively to qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7) will be required to receive and sign off on a disclosure document in compliance with certain CFT rules The disclosure documents contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA, as well as the composite performance of accounts under the CTA's management over at least the most recent five years. Investor interested in investing in any of the programs on this website are urged to carefully read these disclosure documents, including, but not limited to the performance information, before investing in any such programs.

Those investors who are qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7 and interested in investing in a program exempt from having to provide a disclosure document and considered by the regulations to be sophisticated enough to understand the risks and be able to interpret the accuracy and completeness of any performance information on their own.

RCM receives a portion of the commodity brokerage commissions you pay in connection with your futures trading and/or a portion of the interest income (if any) earned on an account's assets. The listed manager may also pay RCM a portion of the fees they receive from accounts introduced to them by RCM.

See the full terms of use and risk disclaimer here.

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