The 10 Most Intriguing Attain Alternatives Posts of 2014

We wanted to go back through and reflect on our posts that you found the most interesting this year. Without Further Ado, The Top 10 Posts in 2014 based off of how many of you read it.

  1. What a Hedge Fund Failure Looks Like
    This year, social media cannot get enough of the news that hedge fund legend Paul Tudor Jones is shutting down one of his eponymous funds, the Tudor Tensor Fund. But just how bad was the Tensor performance that they are deciding to shut the fund down?  What does a hedge fund ‘failure’ actually look like? The answer is, not that bad…
  2. A Big List of Alternative Investment Folks on Twitter
    We couldn’t find a list of alternative investment folks, and specifically those focused on commodities, managed futures, and global macro strategies on Twitter. So we went out and did it ourselves. Here’s our compilation of people and firms currently out there on twitter (in no particular order, despite the numbering) providing the latest insight, humor, debate, and news on investments – especially the alternative kind.
  3. CNBC Didn’t Screw up their Interview with David Harding
    CNBC made another attempt at interviewing Winton’s David Harding and this time around they managed to ask questions actually dealing with the Managed Futures industry. Here are our takeaways from the interview:
  4. 23 Commodity, Equity, and Currency Markets since the 2009 Low
    March 2014 officially marked 5 years since we had 700 point down moves in the Dow, Lehman going bankrupt, and new market lows dragging down commodities. We all know where the equity markets have gone since then, but what about 23 other markets since the March 9th, 2009 low? Plus, asset class performance 5 years before and 5 years after March 2009.
  5. A Brief History of Man AHL, Winton, & Aspect
    It’s hard to believe, but three of the biggest managed futures programs in the world, Man AHL, Winton, and Aspect Capital; all trace their roots back to three 20 something Brits at Oxford and Cambridge in the 80’s. Here’s a brief history.
  6. Why Hedge Funds Don’t Care if They’re Underperforming the S&P
    The problem with saying hedge funds are underperforming the S&P 500 is that the grand majority of them aren’t even trying to beat the S&P 500 in returns, for any set period. They are trying to deliver better risk adjusted returns than the stock market, but that doesn’t make for as good of a headline.
  7. Our Interview With Winton’s David Harding
    Since Winton CEO David Harding was in Chicago this summer receiving his pinnacle award, we thought we’d put some questions directly to him on the industry, how they trade, and so forth… enjoy:
  8. Complacency Everywhere” 
    Here’s the thing that was driving those who do more than just stocks — CRAZY. This spring, It wasn’t just the stock market that was seeing record low volatility. Complacency was everywhere. It was for sure in stocks, but it was also in…
  9. Rise of the Robo-Advisors?
    What are Robo Advisors? Why the sudden attention from the financial media? Some believe they threaten to shift the way the financial advisor business model works. More importantly, what would this mean for alternative investments.
  10. Under the Hood: Wisdom Tree’s Managed Futures ETF
    You got to hand it to the marketing folks over at Wisdom Tree…. No sooner had the ink dried on Managed Futures good 3rd quarter and the Dow hit new 8 month lows we started to see Wisdom Tree advertising their Managed Futures ETF ($WDTI) on CNBC. Marketing 101 = strike while the iron’s hot. But how much “managed futures” exposure are you really getting with this product? Let’s take a look under the hood, shall we?

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Disclaimer
The performance data displayed herein is compiled from various sources, including BarclayHedge, RCM's own estimates of performance based on account managed by advisors on its books, and reports directly from the advisors. These performance figures should not be relied on independent of the individual advisor's disclosure document, which has important information regarding the method of calculation used, whether or not the performance includes proprietary results, and other important footnotes on the advisor's track record.

Benchmark index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship, self reporting, and instant history.

Managed futures accounts can subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees. The numbers within this website include all such fees, but it may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits in the future to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets.

Investors interested in investing with a managed futures program (excepting those programs which are offered exclusively to qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7) will be required to receive and sign off on a disclosure document in compliance with certain CFT rules The disclosure documents contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA, as well as the composite performance of accounts under the CTA's management over at least the most recent five years. Investor interested in investing in any of the programs on this website are urged to carefully read these disclosure documents, including, but not limited to the performance information, before investing in any such programs.

Those investors who are qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7 and interested in investing in a program exempt from having to provide a disclosure document and considered by the regulations to be sophisticated enough to understand the risks and be able to interpret the accuracy and completeness of any performance information on their own.

RCM receives a portion of the commodity brokerage commissions you pay in connection with your futures trading and/or a portion of the interest income (if any) earned on an account's assets. The listed manager may also pay RCM a portion of the fees they receive from accounts introduced to them by RCM.

See the full terms of use and risk disclaimer here.

Disclaimer
The performance data displayed herein is compiled from various sources, including BarclayHedge, RCM's own estimates of performance based on account managed by advisors on its books, and reports directly from the advisors. These performance figures should not be relied on independent of the individual advisor's disclosure document, which has important information regarding the method of calculation used, whether or not the performance includes proprietary results, and other important footnotes on the advisor's track record.

Benchmark index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship, self reporting, and instant history.

Managed futures accounts can subject to substantial charges for management and advisory fees. The numbers within this website include all such fees, but it may be necessary for those accounts that are subject to these charges to make substantial trading profits in the future to avoid depletion or exhaustion of their assets.

Investors interested in investing with a managed futures program (excepting those programs which are offered exclusively to qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7) will be required to receive and sign off on a disclosure document in compliance with certain CFT rules The disclosure documents contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA, as well as the composite performance of accounts under the CTA's management over at least the most recent five years. Investor interested in investing in any of the programs on this website are urged to carefully read these disclosure documents, including, but not limited to the performance information, before investing in any such programs.

Those investors who are qualified eligible persons as that term is defined by CFTC regulation 4.7 and interested in investing in a program exempt from having to provide a disclosure document and considered by the regulations to be sophisticated enough to understand the risks and be able to interpret the accuracy and completeness of any performance information on their own.

RCM receives a portion of the commodity brokerage commissions you pay in connection with your futures trading and/or a portion of the interest income (if any) earned on an account's assets. The listed manager may also pay RCM a portion of the fees they receive from accounts introduced to them by RCM.

See the full terms of use and risk disclaimer here.