Weekend Reads: 66 Million Years Old

“This dinosaur has been laying here for at least 66 million years,” Sertich said. “I’m over the moon right now about this dinosaur fossil.”

Construction crew finds rare triceratops fossil in Thornton – (KDVR)

 

Broadly speaking, rich people own the upside of the economy in the form of stock, while the middle class’s gains are limited by the slow growth of housing wealth. Wolff finds, unsurprisingly, that the collapse of the housing bubble exacerbated wealth inequality, because stocks recovered more strongly than real estate did.

How the Top 1% Keeps Getting Richer – (Bloomberg)

 

Actual U.S. corporate tax rates are about half the official 35 percent rate

Corporations pay between 13 and 19 percent in federal taxes—far less than the 35 percent statutory tax rate – (Economic Policy Institute)

 

One idea quietly being discussed would be taxing the money that workers place into their 401(k) savings plans up front: an idea that would raise billions of dollars in the short-term and is pulled from the Camp plan

Trump’s team and lawmakers making strides on tax reform plan – (Politico)

 

There, the cells are genetically altered to have a new gene that codes for a protein—called a chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR. This protein directs the T cells to target and kill leukemia cells with a specific antigen on their surface. The genetically modified cells are then infused back into the patient.

FDA Approves Groundbreaking Gene Therapy for Cancer – (Technology Review)

 

All states had more than 20% of adults with obesity.

Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps – (CDC)

 

In a worldwide study, the U.S. fell to No. 17 (down three spots from last year) in the Natixis Global Asset Management Global Retirement Index. The index ranks 43 mainly developed countries on their ability to offer its citizens a secure retirement. Norway, Switzerland and Sweden top the list.

Why retiring in America has become less attractive – (MarketWatch)

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